Overlooked Miami Beach police shooting exposes legal system’s limp response to needless killing

Raymond Hérisse never made it to his hangover. It was waiting for him, the sour remnant of all the Hennessy he’d been imbibing early the morning of May 30, 2011. But he was still drunk that Memorial Day when he was shot to death at the wheel of his borrowed Hyundai Sonata by 12 police officers in Miami Beach, Fla. He was hit 16 times; later, investigators recovered 124 spent rounds.

Hérisse was 22. It was Urban Beach Weekend, an annual bacchanal that draws to the seaside town a huge outpouring of largely black, largely young, revelers from throughout South Florida. Hérisse was visiting from his home 60-some miles up the coast in Boynton Beach. In the minutes before he died he had been driving his friend’s car foolishly and dangerously along the city’s main thoroughfare Collins Avenue, two blocks from the ocean, careening off several other cars, swerving onto the wrong side of the street and even onto the sidewalk, sending pedestrians and bicycle-riding police scurrying for safety—and drawing gunfire from eight cops as his Sonata rolled along.

Finally the car stopped at 13th Street. It’s not known whether Hérisse had been hit by any of the 44 bullets already fired at the car. The Sonata remained motionless for over a minute; through the tinted windows witnesses thought Hérisse was moving. Maybe he was reaching for a gun. When he didn’t respond to police screaming at him to get out, they started shooting again—eight of them, popping away with their Glocks and Sig Sauers, 81 more rounds for investigators to pick up and count.

By the time it was over a total of 12 officers from three different forces enlisted to handle the weekend crowds had fired on Raymond Hérisse. They hit four bystanders, wounding them severely, and they killed Hérisse.

The affair got a bit of notoriety at the time after police seized and destroyed the smartphone of one of several onlookers who had the presence of mind to record the fusillade. He managed to get his video to CNN only by hiding the memory card in his mouth. So for a moment the incident became a press freedom issue.

As it happens, I was asleep about 10 blocks away at the time of the shooting, and as the facts trickled in was appalled by what seemed to be the grotesque and murderous disproportionality of the police response. What was going on? Why did it take three days for police to announce they’d found a gun in the car, which it turned out was under a seat, wrapped in a shirt, untouched? And in a city that had been convulsed repeatedly in the ‘80s and ‘90s by racial violence triggered by lethal predation by police, would there be any reckoning?

It took local authorities nearly four years to come up with a determination as to whether anybody, apart from Raymond Hérisse, did anything wrong that pre-dawn morning. Finally on March 16, the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Office released its findings, which cleared police of any criminal wrongdoing (the civil Continue reading “Overlooked Miami Beach police shooting exposes legal system’s limp response to needless killing”